Maybe They Were Trying To Help

When I was in college (the computer-science time, not the music time) I worked as a Java developer at an applied research centre who’s purpose was to develop an open-sourced EMR solution. Long story short, the code base was a mess, the workflow was a mess, the documentation was a mess; the whole damn thing was just a mess. Lots of components doing repetitive or redundant tasks unnecessarily adding to the complexity of the solution. One day, I came up with a way to simplify the software. I spent a lot of time planning and designing and had a little report ready to show my boss with eager excitement. However, my boss wasn’t up for change. My well thought out idea was shot down; and he wasn’t even nice about it. I felt awfully small, and I went back to my cubicle; tail betwixt my legs with an “I was just trying to help” tear welling up in my eye.

I think that’s how Valve and Bethesda must feel today.

It was a whirlwind of a weekend for them. Bethesda and Valve attempted to implement a marketplace for players to give pay for game mods and user generated content. The introduction of a paid mods system did not hit the community well; the backlash was insane. A seemingly innocent attempt at improving the modding community by pumping some cash into it was shot down like a clay pigeon. It turned from an idea and a new marketplace into the gamers demanding to talk to who was responsible for some heinous crime.

And yesterday the people responsible attempted to explain themselves:

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.jsTwo hours later they threw in the towel:

 

Their model made sense, at least to me. In the past, applying this type of model to user generated content actually improved the output quality and made it better and easier to contribute. To their credit, they did their research and the data showed that this could be a great idea. Sure, there was a bit of revenue sharing between the content creator, Steam, and Bethesda. But as they mentioned in their blog this is a standard practice, and again was a model that proved successful in the past.

Standard or not, we were having none of it.

I can’t imagine that Bethesda was attempting something harmful or malicious to their customers. Again, in their blog they show that income from Steam is only 1% of their revenue stream. In their eyes the past indicated a way for them to make their games, their mods, and their mod developers successful. It seemed to me that they wanted to give a platform for mod-developers to turn their efforts into a revenue stream and become “indie developers.”

But if the past is an indication of anything, we are resistant to change. As the old adage seams to go: if it ain’t broke and you try to fix it, and we’ll run you out on a rail. Even if you are just trying to help.


What do you think about paid mods? Good idea? Bad idea? Was Valve and Bethesda just trying to make a quick buck? Comment here or tweet me on Twitter: @adamthegameguy

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